Kit

Kit Perriman

SMOKE RINGS


May 22, 2018

Marty Robbins’ ALL AROUND COWBOY

All Around Cowboy

(Marty Robbins)

Well, all around cowboy, I’ve won it six years in a row,
All around cowboy means champ of the big rodeo.
I made me some money, I had me some good times,
The falls that I’ve had have been few, until
a rodeo queen made the all around cowboy
Look like an all around fool!

I was the cowboy that said he would never be roped,
I even bragged how I’d never be branded or broke.
I was doing right well till this blonde, little filly
Rode into my life like a dream,
And the all around cowboy fell head over heels
In love with the rodeo queen.

The moment I looked in her blue eyes I knew I was gone.
I tried to hide them, but the feelings I had were too strong.
She showed the world what an all around cowboy could do.
She showed the world how an all around cowboy
Could look like an all around fool!

She made me feel like a horse without any fire,
Too late I realized, breaking me was her desire.
She rolled me, and raked me with spurs, that left such a hurt.
She left me broken, and she left me crying
Out there in the rodeo dirt.

 



May 21, 2018

Tomahawks

  • A tomahawk is a single-handled ax from North America.
  • It closely resembles a hatchet.
  • This multi-purpose chopping tool was familiar to both Native Americans and Colonials.
  • It could also be used as a weapon, either in hand-to-hand combat or thrown from a distance.
  • The tomahawk is thought to have been invented by the Algonquin.
  • The first designs were made from flint, bound by rawhide to a wooden handle.
  • When the Europeans arrived they introduced a more effective metal blade.
  • They are usually about 2-feet long with maple, hickory, or ash handles.
  • The opposite side of the blade could form a spike, hammer, or be drilled to make a smoking-pipe.
  • The tomahawk became a popular symbol when Colonists and Native Tribes met – they could choose the pipe of peace or the ax of war!


May 18, 2018

Broadway’s PAINT YOUR WAGON

Paint Your Wagon

(A.J. Lerner and F. Loewe)

Gold
Gold
Gold
Gold
Gold
Gold
Gold
Gotta dream boy?
Gotta song?
Paint your wagon
And come along!
Where am I going?
I don’t know.
Where am I heading?
I ain’t certain.
All I know
Is I am on my way!
When will I be there?
I don’t know.
When will I get there?
I ain’t certain.
All that I know
Is I am on my way!
Gotta dream boy?
Gotta song?
Paint your wagon
[And come along – Sung In German]
[Verse sung in German]
[Verse sung in Chinese]
[Verse sung in American Indian]
Gotta dream boy?
Gotta song?
Paint your wagon
And come along!
Where am I going?
I don’t know.
When will I be there?
I ain’t certain.
What will I get?
I ain’t equipped to say.
But who gives a damn?
Who gives a damn?
Who gives a damn?
We’re on our way!
Where am I going?
I don’t know.
Where am I heading?
I ain’t certain.
All that I know
Is I am on my way!
When will I be there?
I don’t know.
When will I get there?
I ain’t certain.
All that I know
Is I am on my way!
When am I going?
I don’t know.
Where am I heading?
I ain’t certain.
All that I know
Is I am on my way!
When will I be there?
I don’t know.
When will I get there?
I ain’t certain.
All that I know
Is I am on my way!
Gotta dream boy?
Gotta song?
Paint your wagon
And come along!
Where are we going?
I don’t know.
When will we be there?
I ain’t certain.
What will we get?
I ain’t equipped to say.
But who gives a damn?
Who gives a damn?
We’re on our way!
From the movie version of Paint Your Wagon:


May 17, 2018

War Bonnets

War Bonnets.

  • War Bonnets are an important part of the Blackfoot, Sioux, Crow, Cherokee, and Plains Cree ceremonies, but are not adopted by every Native American tribe.
  • There are three distinct styles:

 

The Trailer (Sioux)

 

The Halo (Crow)

 

The Straight-Up (Blackfoot)

  • War Bonnets are only made from Golden Eagle feathers.
  • Each feather tells a story.  It has to be earned in an act of bravery.
  • Some feathers are painted or dyed red to commemorate a special deed or event.
  • These head-dresses are often decorated with ermine or fancy beadwork.
  • Only men have War Bonnets.
  • They are generally worn to honor chiefs or warriors.


May 16, 2018

Cowboy Wisdom #11

“Women have more fun

because there’s more things forbidden to them!”



May 15, 2018

25 Facts: The Arapaho

The Arapaho Nation

  1. The Arapaho were traditionally a Plains Tribe, found in Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska, and Kansas.
  2. They were thought to have originated in the Minnesota region, where they grew maize and other crops.
  3. These farmers got pushed onto the plains by the Ojibwe.  They first used dogs to pull their travois.
  4. After acquiring horses, the Arapaho moved further south.
  5. They followed the buffalo herds and eventually became nomadic traders.
  6. These warriors were highly skilled horsemen.
  7. Their language is of Algonquian origin.
  8. It has been suggested that the name Arapaho comes from either the Pawnee word for trader, or the Crow word for tattoo.
  9. They have always been close allies of the Cheyenne.
  10. There are five divisions within the Arapaho Nation, each with their own distinct dialect.
  11. On the Great Plains they were further divided into the Northern Arapaho and the Southern Arapaho.
  12. There are eight military societies, clans, or soldier bands.  These are age-based.  A young man passes from one to another as he matures.
  13. The Arapaho tattoo small circles on their bodies.
  14. Each warrior painted himself and his horse in his own unique design before going on the warpath.
  15. Soldiers built up their reputations by counting coup on their enemies.
  16. Their weapons include clubs, lances, knives, tomahawks, bows, shotguns, rifles, and pistols.
  17. They traditionally lived in teepees made from buffalo hides.
  18. They hunted elk, deer, and buffalo, but they also ate berries, roots, and plants.
  19. In hard times, they were sometimes forced to eat their dogs.
  20. The Arapaho held an annual Sun Dance before the Great Summer Buffalo Hunt.
  21. These people were among the victims of the Sand Creek Massacre of 1864.
  22. This atrocity sparked the Indian Wars on the Southern Plains.
  23. The Northern Arapaho took part in Red Cloud’s War (1866-1868).
  24. Only five of their warriors were present at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, 1876.
  25. They were active participants of the Ghost Dance Movement in the 1880s.

Sources:

Legends of America, “Arapaho: Great Buffalo Hunters of the Plains,” at http://www.legendsofamerica.com/na-arapaho.html

Northern Arapaho Tribe, “Northern Arapaho History” at http://www.northernarapaho.com/history

Wikipedia, “Arapaho” at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arapaho



May 14, 2018

Marty Robbins’ COOL WATER

Cool Water

(David Byrne, Chris Frantz, Jerry Harrison, and Tina Weymouth)

All day I’ve faced a barren waste
Without the taste of water, cool water.
Old Dan and I, with throats burned dry,
And souls that cry for water.
Cool, clear water.

The nights are cool and I’m a fool
Each star’s a pool of water.
Cool water.
And with the dawn I’ll wake and yawn
And carry on to water; cool, clear water.

Keep a-moving, Dan, don’t you listen to him, Dan,
He’s a devil, not a man,
And he spreads the burning sand with water.
Dan, can you see that big, green tree?
Where the water’s running free
And it’s waiting there for you and me?
Water; cool, clear water.

The shadows sway and seem to say,
“Tonight we pray for water,
Cool water.”
And way up there, He’ll hear our prayer
And show us where
There’s water.  Cool, clear water!



May 11, 2018

The Ghost Dance Prophet

Wovoka (1856 – 1932)

  • Wovoka was the Paiute religious leader who triggered The Ghost Dance Movement.
  • His white name was Jack Wilson.
  • When the prophet was orphaned as a child he was adopted by the Wilson Family – Nevada ranchers who taught him English and Christianity.
  • He left the ranch to become a tribal Holy Man.
  • Wovoka claimed he could control the weather, and several of his followers told of his miraculous deeds.  He was said to be able to light his pipe with the sun.  Some people claimed he was the new Messiah – the Native version of Jesus.
  • On January 1, 1889 Wovoka experienced a vision during a solar eclipse.
  • He saw the resurrection of their dead ancestors, and a removal of the white people from North America.
  • To bring this vision to pass, his followers had to perform a 5-day dancing and singing ritual called The Ghost Dance.
  • Some believers made special Ghost Shirts for the ceremony.  They were said to be bullet proof.
  • The prophet, however, never left Paiute land.  Followers came to him. He relied on missionary disciples to spread his teachings across the various tribes.
  • Unfortunately, this allowed his words to be misinterpreted and misrepresented.
  • Although he taught a non-violent restitution to former glory, men like Short Bull and Kicking Bear manipulated his pacifism to insight rebellion on some of the reservations.
  • The Ghost Dance gained such rapid popularity it was seen as a threat to white stability.
  • The Pine Ridge Agency was singled out as a hotbed of dissention, which culminated in the tragedy of the Wounded Knee Massacre and the end of the Ghost Dance Movement.

Sources:

Brown, Dee, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (New York: Holt, Rinehart and Wilson)

PBS:The West, “Wovoka / Jack Wilson,” at https://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/people/s_z/wovoka.htm

ViewZone, “Wovoka,” at http://www.viewzone.com/wovoka.html

Wikipedia, “Wovoka,” at  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wovoka



May 10, 2018

Cowgirl Spirit #3



May 09, 2018

Kit’s Crit: The Earth Is Weeping (Peter Cozzens)

The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story Of The Indian Wars For The American West

(Peter Cozzens)

The Earth Is Weeping is one of the most comprehensive and well-written accounts of the American Indian Wars of 1861-1891.  Peter Cozzens’ impeccably-researched, objective portrayal of the acts of bravery and incomprehensible atrocities committed on both sides makes compelling reading.  He examines the trusts and betrayals – mistrusts and support – vengeance – greed – long standing rivalries and hatreds that made up the causes and effects of the wars for the plains.

Cozzens takes pains to point out that there was no government extermination policy, but rather a lot of good and bad intentions in the name of Manifest Destiny.  Inter-tribal battles and inter-racial tensions helped escalate a volatile situation into the ultimate tragedy at Wounded Knee, where the Native Americans became overwhelmed by a technically-stronger invading force.  There is no romanticizing of men like Custer and Geronimo either.  Cozzens examines their strengths and weaknesses, achieving a candid balance to this bloody period in American history.

The Earth Is Weeping makes excellent addition to Dee Brown’s classic, Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee.  Highly recommended.



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